Trump Train or Bulldozer?

All eyes are on Trump and Washington DC as the Trump Train rolls through our capital. Trump has been even more aggressive in using Executive Orders and in speaking to foreign leaders than most suspected and that has the Street on edge. Maybe we need to rename the Trump Train to the Trump Bulldozer. While most eyes are on Trump we are increasingly focused on the Fed. The Fed must attempt to act in concert with the President and his fiscal policy to avoid overheating or stalling the economy but good luck to them anticipating his next move. The Fed has made noise in recent weeks that perhaps it could shrink the size of its portfolio. The Fed has been consistent, in that, there was an inherent belief at the Eccles Building that the Fed did not need to shrink its balance sheet and that doing so would be the last maneuver in its process of normalizing rates. Ben Bernanke, former Fed Chairman, took the time out to explain in his blog why that is simply not a good idea. Could it be that politics are playing a role at the Fed?

…best approach is to allow a passive runoff of maturing assets, without attempting to vary the pace of rundown for policy purposes. However, even with such a cautious approach, the effects of initiating a reduction in the Fed’s balance sheet are uncertain. Accordingly, it would be prudent not to initiate that process until the short-term interest rate is safely away from the effective lower bound. 

…the FOMC may still ultimately agree that the optimal balance sheet need not be radically smaller than its current level. If so, then the process of shrinking the balance sheet need not be rapid or urgently begun.  Ben Bernanke

 Why is the Fed now talking about shrinking its balance sheet and not raising rates? We would like to see more consistency from the Fed. They have insinuated that three rates hikes are due this year. After taking a pass on raising rates this week and not setting the table for one in March the market is now pricing in just two rate hikes. The first rate hike is due in June and the second in December. If you have not read our Quarterly Letter you can take a peak for a further discussion on the topic. The short version is, if the Fed raises rates too slowly Trump’s policies may overheat the stock market which is at already historical valuations.

 If Fed Speak can’t jawbone a March rate hike back onto the table, policymakers will have precious little room for error to make good on their promised three rate increases for the remainder of the year. Danielle DiMartino Booth

February is the worst performing month in the October – May period but investors are heavily loaded up on equities regardless.  By way of Arthur Cashin , here are the widely followed Jason Goepfert’s notes on the market’s latest gyrations or lack thereof.

 After spurting to a new all-time high in late January, the S&P 500 has had a daily change of less than 0.1% for five of the six sessions since then. That’s almost unprecedented, but there have been times when it has contracted into an extremely tight range after a breakout. Several of those have occurred in just the past few years, and all of them preceded a tough slog for stocks over the medium-term. Hedge funds are betting that the rally continues. Exposure to stocks among macro hedge funds is estimated to be the highest since July 2015 and the 4th-highest in the past decade. The three other times it got this high, stocks struggled as the funds reduced exposure and eventually went short.

Stocks have stalled. Investors are heavily exposed to equities. February is not the best month for equities so investors aren’t expecting much. The market has a way of surprising you. Could the market finally be ready to make a move? Investors seem to be heavily tilted to the rally side of the boat.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

High and Rising

“Is Trump aggressive and thoughtful or aggressive and reckless?”

– Ray Dalio  Davos World Economic Forum 1/18/17

And we sit and we wait. How will Trump preside? The market and market players would have been more at ease with a Clinton presidency. She would have been easier to predict. Trump is different. He does not have years of governance or position papers in order for us to decipher his next move. Judging by his Inaugural Address, which will be forever known as the American Carnage speech, we can see that he intends to be aggressive and populist. The question remains is he going to be thoughtful in his aggressiveness or reckless? Is his aggressiveness just the first shot in a never ending negotiation? We get the feeling that everything Trump does is a negotiation and everything he says is a means to an end in that negotiation. Will it be a thoughtful negotiation or a reckless one? Businessmen like Trump tend to get their way and get it quickly. Let’s see how he feels after the first 100 days of getting bogged down in the swamp. What starts off thoughtful could become reckless.

If it feels as if we have been waiting two years for some resolution to the current market environment it’s because we have. With the exception of a one month rally that started on Election Night 2016 the stock market has gone nowhere since the ending of QE3 in late 2014. Central bank policy here in the US has been one of tightening and that has kept a clamp on equity pricing. It is with the possibility of an administration that would spend fiscally to stimulate the economy along with committing to tax reform and deregulation that the market has seen further fuel for the latest rise in equity prices.

If you haven’t read our Quarterly Letter the synopsis is that the combination of experimental central bank policy and the new administration’s stated goals raises the odds that we are going to have some sort of error in monetary and/or fiscal policy. Any policy error could resolve itself in one of two ways. If central banks drag their feet and raise rates too slowly then that policy error could insight animal spirits and drive equity valuations even higher, possibly to bubble like valuations. Raise rates too quickly and equity prices fall sharply. The current populist rhetoric has us thinking of the 1930’s. The 1930’s had tremendous rallies and stumbles in the stock market. Not to say that we will repeat the pattern of the 1930’s but things certainly rhyme with talk of income inequality, trade barriers and populist rhetoric.

Equity valuations are high and bond prices could be in bubble territory. We do not think equity prices are in bubble territory yet. We continue to lean away from bond like equities and more towards seeking value where we can find it. As for bonds, we believe the bottom to be in for yields in the 35 year bull market. Our duration is quite low and we look forward to rising bond yields as they will allow us to reinvest at higher yields.

Keep an eye on Washington and on Twitter. In the next 100 days we may find out if Trump is going to be thoughtful or reckless. The idea of the return to the 1930’s does not make us feel warm and fuzzy but we believe that the pendulum swings to extremes and back again. A populist uprising is the natural evolution of globalization. It should be expected that once populism’s peak has been reached the pendulum will swing back but for the moment Trump and populism are in full swing.

If you would like to read more of our thoughts and a deeper dive into what we see coming in 2017 follow the link below to our website and our First Quarterly Letter of 2017.

http://blackthornasset.com/investment-philosophy/outlook-qtrly-letter/

 

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

When Everyone Agrees

Here is a short blog today as we are currently writing our end of the year letter and formulating our investment thesis for 2017. Bob Farrell was an absolute legend during his 5 decades on Wall Street and finished his career on the Street as the Chief Strategist at Merrill Lynch. Farrell encapsulated his 45 years of experience in his widely distributed 10 Rules for Investing.  As our thoughts turn to what is going to happen in 2017 we find ourselves turning to his sage like wisdom. While they are all of equal importance we find ourselves drawn to #9 as 2017 dawns.

  1. Markets tend to return to the mean over time.
  2. Excesses in one direction will lead to an opposite excess in the other direction.
  3. There are no new eras — excesses are never permanent.
  4. Exponential rising and falling markets usually go further than you think.
  5. The public buys the most at the top and the least at the bottom.
  6. Fear and greed are stronger than long-term resolve.
  7. Markets are strongest when they are broad and weakest when they narrow.
  8. Bear markets have three stages.
  9. When all the experts and forecasts agree, something else is going to happen.
  10. Bull markets are more fun than bear markets.

Seemingly, every single investing professional that we read or talk has the same expectations for 2017. Experts see a January dip being bought and Wall Street’s best and brightest see 2017 returning a rather staid 5% on average according to Barron’s. We have a funny feeling that isn’t quite how it’s going to work out. When everyone agrees – something else will happen. We will be back next week with our thoughts on how we feel it is going to work out. Hope you have a healthy, happy and prosperous 2017!!

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

Buckle Up

In the 1st Quarter of 2017 it will mark 8 years of the bull. Valuations are elevated to say the least but new policies from the White House and Republicans may give another boost to the market. A new resident at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue can introduce risk to the market. A new leader in the Executive Office may prefer to take a recession or market rout early on in their term in order to blame the other guy. But this new leader seems to be unlike any other we have ever seen. In the short term moving into Q1 we think that there may be some buyer’s remorse on the Trump win. Not in relation to Trump (we are agnostic politically in terms of making investment returns) but in relation to getting those policies of decreased regulation, lower taxes and the repatriation of funds actually passed. The Supreme Court may have to come first.

January could find some bumps in the road but once a bull market gets this far we expect it to end in spectacular fashion. Two years come to mind that took place in a rising interest rate environment – 1981 and 1987. In 1981 Ronald Reagan came into the Oval Office with great expectations and saw stock prices up 5% in the first quarter of his Presidency.The market then fell over 19% in Reagan’s first nine months in office. While this does rhyme somewhat with the Trump Rally the landscape was very different in 1981. Although 1981 was a period of rising interest rates we saw a nation that was struggling with a 14 year bear market and an economy that was treading water with Fed Fund rates in the early teens and rising. 1981 was an environment of low valuations and high interest rates which is just the opposite of what we have today.

A year that might have more significance would be 1987. At the dawn of 1987 share prices had appreciated more than 100% from the lows put in 5 years earlier and the year began with a bang. The Dow Jones would be up 35% by August of that year. While the Federal Reserve was raising rates euphoria ran wild on Wall Street with seemingly daily mergers creating wealth for shareholders. “Animal Spirits” of a rising stock market took hold and shares ran higher with investors fearing that they were being left behind and easy money was being made on Wall Street. 2017 could bring something very similar. Investors are anxious as valuations are historically elevated and, while not wanting to take on added risk, there is a fear of being left behind. According to Sir John Templeton bull markets die in euphoria. We are at the point where we think this market is close to euphoria and it being more likely that this bull move ends with a bang and not with a whimper. While valuations have us cautious and protecting against negative shocks to the system what we could see is a shocking move higher.  

In Jeremy Grantham’s work on bubbles he postulated in June of last year that the market could run up to close to 3000 on the S&P 500 before breaking under the weight of excessive bubble – like valuations. That would be about 30% from here.

This week it became evident that Trump’s win could give rise to policies that would provide the Fed the cover that it needs to be more aggressive in raising rates. In their first post election meeting Janet Yellen and the Federal Reserve are predicted 3 interest rates hikes in 2017 rather than the 2 expected previously. While we all know the Fed is notoriously inept at predicting anything its current projections show a more aggressive hawkishness from its previous stance. This could help normalize interest rates into the range of 2-5% that the Fed prefers. This would be healthy from a longer term perspective and give the Federal Reserve ammunition should another crisis arise but it may produce some bumps in the road near term. We think that this normalization would be a net positive by giving business owners more confidence and more impetus to invest in their organizations which in the long term would be supportive to jobs and the economy.  

US Treasury rates on the 10 year are hovering around 2.6% as they seemingly stabilized this week. As far as equities go investors kept their wallet on their hip this week and did not drive the market into further overbought territory. There is some angst over the end of the year and the memory of the last several January’s which saw equities move lower. We expect investors are ready and willing to buy the next dip. That dip will probably not be pronounced and may provide kindling for the animal spirits to drive the market higher in 2017.   

Chinese may be struggling as they saw had debt and currency issues this week. Their currency is falling rapidly as they try to maintain control. China’s economy and their relationship with the US is shaping up to be THE story of 2017.The Saudi’s still wish to see a higher oil price at least until the Aramco IPO gets floated in 2017. They will try and keep oil stable and rising until then. Watch the Aramco IPO for clues as to oil’s direction. Markets are still overbought and Santa has not even arrived yet. Market pundits are seemingly all calling for a low return year. What you expect is not usually what you get when it comes to the stock market. When everyone is leaning one way we lean the other. We see volatility coming back and some wide swings up and down. Buckle up.   

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Bulletproof

If something cannot go on forever, it will stop. – Herbert Stein American Economist

Herbert Stein was an American Economist who worked in several White House administrations and was, more famously, the father of the actor Ben Stein. (Ferris Bueller’s Day Off – “Bueller? – Bueller?”) If Mr. Stein were still with us he might find his famous quote useful this week. What we had was another 5 days of trading and another 3% higher for the S&P 500. Investors continue to plow into financials, industrials and materials while moving away from bonds and bond like equities such as utilities and real estate. Investment professionals are afraid of being left in the dust and having clients see that their portfolios don’t include the latest outperformers so they are adding them at a heady clip. It is the time honored tradition called “Window Dressing”.

Trees don’t grow to the sky and what cannot continue – won’t. David Rosenberg from Gluskin Sheff was quick to note this week that Reagan’s honeymoon lasted 6 months and 6% before seeing the market fall 25% over the next two years in the face of a rising dollar and rising bond yields. Sound familiar?

Monetary policy has been responsible for the majority of the gains in the stock market since the crisis began in 2008. The Federal Reserve pulled forward returns in seeking to engage “animal spirits” in the stock market to raise valuations. The belief was that rising asset prices would help the economy by shoring up balance sheets with higher valuations and by engendering decision makers with the confidence that higher prices would bring. Fast forward 8 years and we are truly seeing “animal spirits”. Our overriding question over the last 8 years is what happens when the monetary policy accommodation rug gets pulled out from underneath the investor? A decrease in monetary accommodation here in the US will only send the US Dollar higher, decrease asset values, and exacerbate geopolitical uncertainty in emerging markets while increasing volatility in asset pricing around the globe. We are starting to see central bankers around the world attempt to withdraw accommodation. File this one under” be careful what you wish for”.

Two things are being bandied about as fact. One thesis that traders seem to be buying into is the “Inauguration Day Trade”. Traders believe, as proffered by Jeff Gundlach, that this rally will peak before Inauguration Day. The second is that bond yields in excess of 2.75% on the 10 year will cause stock prices to fall. Keep an eye on both the yield and the calendar.

Dow Theory kicked in on Wednesday. Transports are up almost 50% from their lows in January to eclipse the all time highs of late 2014. Up 17% in the last month!! This has all the earmarks of a blow off top and we may not be finished yet. We have speculated for some time that this would be how this bull market ended – Straight up in spectacular fashion. While we have been cautious on the valuations of this market for some time the missing ingredient to a top in the market has been investor euphoria. Well, the Trump win may have provided just that. Hang on tight.

Markets are overbought. Santa may have arrived early. January may see some reversal of fortune but it looks like the trade is in place for now. Out with bonds and bond like equities and in with financials, industrials and materials. Market continues to shrug off major geopolitical financial events at an ever faster pace. The Italian Referendum was shrugged off in minutes. Ego kills when it comes to investing. Bulls are feeling bulletproof.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Published in: on December 10, 2016 at 12:59 pm  Leave a Comment  
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The Trump Rally Meets The Swamp

The Trump Rally while rooted in ideology and investment theory is not necessarily rooted in reality. While tax reforms, reduced regulation and fiscal stimulus could make for a powerful combination stoking the economy and inflation it is not certain this combination will actually happen and if it does happen it will not happen for some time. Expectations are running a bit too high and this is still Washington DC after all. The roots of the Trump Rally are bound to get stuck in the mud of the Swamp.

Interest rates and the US dollar are rising which can be a dangerous combination. The market can rally with rising interest rates and we believe that it is healthy for interest rates to rise from here and that low interest rates were actually inhibiting growth in the economy. Some semblance of higher interest rates are good for the economy. But for the stock market the current high level of valuations were predicated on TINA (There Is No Alternative). At some point, bonds, real estate or other asset classes become an alternative. The high levels of asset valuations were predicated on low interest rates as all investments are evaluated versus the risk free rate of the 10 year Treasury. A rising ten year means that models may have priced assets too richly.

As you know we follow certain financial leaders and Jeff Gundlach at DoubleLine is one we find most open with his thoughts. Gundlach is on record saying that the 10 year could go to 6% in the next 4 or 5 years. We are of the same thought although not as drastic. In the near term we believe that yields have gone too far too fast along with equities in the post Trump win world. Gundlach spoke to Reuters this week and caused markets to pause as he said much the same. Gundlach feels that the bond selloff has seen its low for now and stocks will take a breather before Inauguration Day. After he spoke bonds rallied and stocks fell. Evidently we are not the only ones listening intently to Gundlach’s views.

Another one of our favorite investing legends is Stanley Druckenmiller. He spoke this week at the Robin Hood Conference in NYC. Druckenmiller does Gundlach one better. He believes that the yield on the 10 year will rise to over 6% in the next year or two!! Druckenmiller is shorting the Euro and the Yen and he believes that if the 10 year rises above 3% then the stock market could see a 10% correction. Let’s face it. The stock market can face a 10% correction if someone sneezes in the Middle East.  A 10% correction is not something to be feared but anticipated. I think that the real takeaway is that at some point the yield on the 10 year becomes more enticing to investors than being in the stock market. The pendulum will swing and bonds will usually give you the correct signals. Keep an eye on the 10 year for hints as what stocks will do.

This Sunday’s referendum in Italy is the markets next boogeyman. Journalist and pundits are predicting the next great financial calamity if there is a “No” vote in Italy. Where have we heard this before? Italy has had 67 governments formed in the last 70 years. Why should 2017 be any different? We don’t mean to diminish the battle that is going on with bad loans at some of Italy’s biggest banks but somehow after seeing the predictions that Brexit would be bad for markets and Trump would be bad for markets we have a hard time believing the next great financial calamity follows the next populist regime change. The Italian Referendum should be another interesting vote. It might be time to become familiar with the name – Beppe Grillo.

Market is working off its collective over bought and oversold conditions. The 10 year closed Friday at 2.39% and should see resistance at the 2.5% level. Stocks have relieved some of their overbought condition but the Trump Rally is seeing some buyer’s remorse at 2200 on the S&P 500. Keep an eye on Italy this weekend.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

The Market’s Violent Transition

“There are decades where nothing happens; and there are weeks where decades happen.” 
― 
Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

This was another busy week for the markets in the aftermath of the Trump victory. There has been a sea change in the outlook for markets going forward which is much more predicated on the House, Senate and White House being controlled by Republicans than it is solely about Trump. A stranglehold on DC by the Republicans will enable them to pass legislation to help stimulate the economy and perhaps stoke the fan of inflation. We had some bright minds check in with their thoughts this week. Ray Dalio proffered his thoughts on LinkedIn this week on the Trump win and where that takes the investing landscape. Dalio feels that we are at a major reversal point that may last a decade.

As a result, whereas the previous period was characterized by 1) increasing globalization, free trade, and global connectedness, 2) relatively innocuous fiscal policies, and 3) sluggish domestic growth, low inflation, and falling bond yields, the new period is more likely to be characterized by 1) decreasing globalization, free trade, and global connectedness, 2) aggressively stimulative fiscal policies, and 3) increased US growth, higher inflation, and rising bond yields. 

As for the effects of this particular ideological/environmental shift, we think that there’s a significant likelihood that we have made the 30-year top in bond prices. We probably have made both the secular low in inflation and the secular low in bond yields relative to inflation. 

 The question will be when will this move short-circuit itself—i.e., when will the rise in nominal (and, more importantly, real) bond yields and risk premiums start hurting other asset prices. 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/reflections-trump-presidency-one-week-after-election-ray-dalio?trk=hp-feed-article-title-publish

The key to success here will asset allocation. The early winning sectors out of the gate are financials, materials and industrials. The losers are bonds, utilities and REIT’s. We will be looking towards oil as we have been writing about for several weeks. The bottom may be in for oil as $60 a barrel looks far likelier than a revisit to the lows of $20 a barrel. US Treasuries have been absolutely hammered since the election and we suspect while the 30 bond bull market in bonds is dead but a trade-able low in bonds may be at hand as bonds are oversold.

We have been prepared for this upward move in bond yields as we sought cover by lowering our duration for our investors. We believe the 30 Year could move to 5% over the next five years. We were shocked to hear Jeffrey Gundlach, whose prescient calls we follow in the bond market, is predicting a move in the 10 Year to over 6% in the next five years. A move of that magnitude is what Dalio is speaking of when he relates that at some point bond yields will move too high for stocks. At some level investors will prefer bond yields to stocks and stocks will falter. At what level that occurs is the current $1 Trillion dollar question.

 Future inflation expectations are soaring. We believe in the sea change that Dalio and Gundlach are espousing with regards to inflation and higher bond yields. In the short term it appears as if everything is currently either overbought or oversold as we have entered this violent rotation out of bonds and bond like instruments into equities. The markets going forward may soon turn their attention to an exit from the EU by Italy as their referendum is fast approaching. For now, 2190-2200 on the S&P 500 is resistance while support is anywhere lower as the buy the dip crowd is back, although, investors will be buying financials rather than utilities. Things may have moved too far too fast. We think that bond yields will soon revert lower if only to relieve their oversold condition but it appears the 30 year trend has changed.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Shock Waves

 “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” – Mark Twain

What the heck was that? An unexpected Trump victory sent shock waves through markets this week. What was once up is now down and what was down is now up. You have probably heard various explanations to this weeks 5% rally in the stock market. Here is my take. While many predicted that markets would sell off 5-10% in light of a Trump victory traders took their hints from the Brexit vote back in June. After the Brexit vote markets sold off but then rallied furiously. So this time, traders never let them sell off. Thinking like an old floor trader we saw many investors get caught offside. When everyone is on the same side of the boat the exits get small.

As we have written before Wall Street is agnostic when it comes to the election. They just want to know which way to bet. They got it horribly wrong and that wrong-footedness contributed to the volatility that we saw this week. Longs needed to be sold and shorts bought. The deflation trade was sold and the inflation trade was bought. Bonds, REIT’s and utilities got pummeled while financial stocks and biotechnology ran higher reversing their courses from the past year.

Going forward the street is betting on US dollar trades and less on globalization of trade. They also see inflation coming back with the Republicans running fiscal deficits and increasing spending on infrastructure while controlling both Houses of Congress and 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Market internals tell us that something is amiss. While markets ran up 450 points after FBI Director Comey cleared Hilary Clinton and what seemed to be her path to the White House markets rallied 500 points when Trump sailed to victory. Also, declining stocks have been higher than advancing stocks while the market hits new highs. According to Arthur Cashin at the NYSE the market saw the largest number of simultaneous new highs and new lows in nearly 50 years. Not a sign of strength.

We believe that the path going forward is to continue to follow the aftermath of Brexit on British markets. While a honeymoon period is to be expected we believe that, as has been the case in Britain, as the honeymoon ends equity markets will begin to consolidate their gains post election and gravitate towards their lows of election night. Market closed on Friday at 2164 on the S&P 500. For now, resistance is at 2170 and then 2190. Market is now overbought and should take a breather here. Lots to come in the next month with the forming of a Trump Cabinet, an Italian referendum that could spell further problems for the EU and a likely rate increase here in the United States.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Published in: on November 12, 2016 at 11:00 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Controlled Burn

I believe risk is most when we feel it least and the risk is least when we feel it most. -Steve Blumenthal CMG

I read Steve Blumenthal’s weekly blog On My Radar every week. I don’t always agree with Steve but he always makes me think. His take on risk really struck a chord with me. I read it over several times. When the wine if flowing and markets are rising we don’t notice that risk is rising. Market moves lower create sheer panic. That gets our attention. It is then that risk is lower. Tops may or may not be forming but the signs are there. Investor complacency. Mega deals. High valuations. Be on guard.

http://www.cmgwealth.com/ri/radar-youve-got-remember-two-things/

Oil has taken a beating over the last week. The negotiations between the OPEC nations have seen more posturing and negotiating and that has oil backing away from $50 a barrel. We think that they are closer to the end of the negotiations than the beginning. Things for the Saudi’s at home are running a little tight and they need higher oil prices. The Saudi’s are looking for cooperation and we think they will make a deal. Right now oil is in a bit of a panic selloff and may seek to retest the lows. Goldman Sachs has piled on by calling for lower oil prices. Doing the opposite of what Goldman says publicly has been a great strategy for years.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-01/goldman-warns-oil-headed-low-40-declining-probability-opec-deal

Arthur Cashin pointed out on Friday morning that the market is on an extended losing streak and it has been picking up steam since breaking through the 2130 level we warned about.

The negative close made it eight down sessions in a row something the S&P hasn’t done since October of 2008 in the days following the Lehman collapse. The severity of the selling was far sharper in 2008. That eight session sell off dinged the S&P for 23% while this move has only sliced 3% from the S&P. 11/4/2016

Friday’s close made it 9 down sessions in a row. That makes for the longest losing streak in 36 years. The market is down only 4.9% from its all time high so this is acting as a very controlled burn. A Trump win could make for more downside but another 5% would be a very healthy 10% correction which we haven’t seen in a while. The big question is will the Federal Reserve still raise rates if Trump wins? That could help propel the selloff. We have our doubts that the Fed will have the stomach for it. If they do we could see cheaper prices. We have had heavy cash positions for some time. One year returns have gone negative on the S&P. Valuations have been high and that justified our cash position. History tells us that markets have struggled to rise from these valuation levels. The market has been stuck in a rut. We would love to see cheaper prices.

Market closed at 2085 which is just above our support level of 2080. Even a blind squirrel finds a nut from time to time. A break of 2080 brings 2040 into play but markets are very oversold and looking for a bounce. 2080 is support for now. We would not be surprised if we do not have a winner on Tuesday night. Gore v Bush. Hold all tickets!

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

 

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

 

 

 

 

Published in: on November 5, 2016 at 8:20 am  Leave a Comment  
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You’ve Got Mail

Just when I thought I was out. They pull me back in.

 – Michael Corleone Godfather III

Was it Michael Corleone or James Comey Director of the FBI? Comey has to be thinking the same as the Godfather as Anthony Weiner’s emails have pulled Comey back into the Clinton investigation and thrown the election and markets for a loop. The S&P 500 was holding support above the 2130 level that we spoke of last week until the explosive news of a reopening of the Clinton email investigation hit the tape on Friday. Markets closed under 2130 for the second time triggering Jeffrey Gundlach’s warning. Monday is going to be a very important day for the short term direction of the market.

Mega mergers are not typically seen as very good for markets. In fact they usually serve as a warning post and signs of a potential top. We were served up with the news of three merger/takeovers last Monday morning. The largest being the ATT Time Warner deal. The AOL Time Warner deal served as the warning bell at the top of the 2000 bull market and the subsequent tech crash. When large companies have squeezed the last drop of growth out of their companies and the business cycle is near the top the playbook calls for buying growth. At the end of the business cycle the only thing left to do is acquire the growth that is not obtainable organically. ATT has recently seen a slowdown in the growth of subscribers. Is this the Hail Mary Pass for ATT? The AOL Time Warner merger is now studied in business classes as the classic failed mega merger. How will history see the ATT Time Warner merger? Better we suspect but sometimes they do ring bells at the top.

As far as the technicals go the 50 Day Moving Average (DMA) on the S&P 500 is now declining. Also, the last two weeks have seen market swoons instead of rallies at the end of the market day. Both serve as warning signs for a tired market. We are entering, which is historically, the best part of the year for stocks. The election and the Federal Reserve may have something to say about that. We are now staring at an election in chaos and a Federal Reserve committee meeting in December where they have all but promised the market that they will raise rates. Will they still raise rates if Trump wins and markets swoon? 2130 is being tested. Pass or fail?

The S&P 500 has now closed below its 100 day moving average for the third straight week. If 2130 fails then the next real level of support is the always critical 200 day moving average at 2078 on the S&P 500.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.