Fear and Greed

While most of America seemed to be mired in statue controversies and rumored and real resignations we choose to focus on making money for our clients. Our focus was on the FOMC Minutes that came out this week. We think that it has real clues as to policy and market direction (i.e. making money). Here, as follows, is the garbled Fed Speak hidden deep in the minutes which we will interpret for you.

This overall assessment incorporated the staff’s judgment that, since the April assessment, vulnerabilities associated with asset valuation pressures had edged up from notable to elevated, as asset prices remained high or climbed further, risk spreads narrowed, and expected and actual volatility remained muted in a range of financial markets…

 recent equity price increases might not provide much additional impetus to aggregate spending on goods and services.

 According to one view, the easing of financial conditions meant that the economic effects of the Committee’s actions in gradually removing policy accommodation had been largely offset by other factors influencing financial markets, and that a tighter monetary policy than otherwise was warranted.

We interpret the committee’s thoughts as, while the committee likes higher stock prices, a further rise in stocks isn’t going to help much. In fact, higher stock prices may actually increase risk. No one seems to be noticing that risk is elevated and hedging accordingly which only heightens risk even further. And by the way, our (the FOMC) tighter policies (raising rates) haven’t really done much and we are going to need to tighten policy much more than we thought. Was that a warning shot across the bow? The Fed doesn’t want stocks to go up much more and tighter policy is coming.

As always, from Arthur Cashin and his sources, comes a very interesting note about the technical aspects of the market. We study technicals because it gives us insight to the psychology of the market. The numbers show where Fear and Greed reside. After Jason’s note came out earlier this week markets were repelled by the 2475 area and fell 2% from that level. Here is Jason’s note.

While they closed within hailing distance of the day’s highs, the session had some very odd aspects. Here’s what the sharp-eyed Jason Goepfert of SentimenTrader noted in his report. More lows. Despite a 1% surge in the S&P 500, its best gain in months, and being within sight of an all-time high, there were more combined new 52-week lows than 52-week highs on the NYSE and Nasdaq exchanges. This is highly abnormal. Since 1965, it has only been seen a handful of days in 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2015 -Cashin’s Comments 8/15/17

NY Federal Reserve President Dudley sees chances of a Fed rate hike higher than the market is currently forecasting in December. Chances for that rate hike are now close to 50% and rising. The market continues to reject the 2475 area on the S&P 500. As a resistance area it is growing in its importance. The bulls still have the ball but they need to get their act together.

The S&P 500 is at its 100 Day Moving Average (DMA) and the 2420-2400 area is support for now. The next support is the 200 DMA at 2350 which is down about 3% from here. If markets fell to that level that would be a 5.5% drop from the all time highs, certainly, not a major crisis. However, the bulls would need to hold the 2350 or then the bears are in charge. The S&P 500 is 2.5% from its highs while the Russell 2000 is down more than 6%. The broader market indicator failed to hold its 200 DMA this week. Not a healthy sign. Always have some dry powder on hand.

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I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

 

 

Anyone Have a Match?

The debt ceiling is coming! The debt ceiling is coming! Not quite Paul Revere but the Treasury market is showing signs that investors are getting concerned about the debt ceiling being reached in mid October as the CBO has warned. If Republicans can’t get a bill through that they have been working on for seven years how will they get the debt ceiling passed through the most polarized congress in history? Months ago we were looking at sweeping changes with the Republicans controlling both houses. Now, instead of tax reform, we are looking at a government shutdown. For once, gridlock in DC may not be so good.

We have been postulating for years that the reason that the economy is not doing well is that interest rates are too low and that there was no threat that interest rates would go higher. Think about it. There has been no incentive to borrow and buy a car, a home or invest in plant and factory. We can “put it off until next year” because we aren’t sure about the economy and rates aren’t going anywhere. We came across this blog post from Epsilon Theory and Dr. Ben Hunt. It is not the common thinking but that is usually where the answer lies.

The reason companies aren’t investing more aggressively in plant and equipment and technology is BECAUSE we have the most accommodative monetary policy in the history of the world, with the easiest money to borrow that corporations have ever seen. Why in the world would management take the risk — and it’s definitely a risk — of investing for real growth when they are so awash in easy money that they can beat their earnings guidance with a risk-free stock buyback?

(As the Fed slowly raises rates) It will force companies to take on more risk. It will force companies to invest more in plant and equipment and technology. It will force companies to pay up for the skilled workers they need.

In exactly the same way that QE was deflationary in practice when it was inflationary in theory, so will the end of QE be inflationary in practice when it is deflationary in theory.

My view: as the tide of QE goes out, the tide of inflation comes in. And the more that the QE tide recedes, the more inflation comes in.

Dr. Ben Hunt Epsilon Theory 

I agree with Dr Hunt that at some point central bankers may be asking – Why is inflation accelerating as we raise rates? How come we cannot contain inflation? In talking to business leaders over the last several years we have not seen many talking up their industry as “hitting on all cylinders”. Last month we spent some time with a leader in the medical device field which he says is booming. Industry players are borrowing for plant and equipment for the first time in years. Combine some tax reform with higher rates and BINGO! That joint is jumping. Central bankers have been pouring gasoline on the pyre for years with no effect. Pushing on a string. Higher rates may be the match and with too much gasoline on the fire inflation may be the result.

Markets have been quiet. A little too quiet. We have read story after story about the volatility trade and how volatility has to spike higher to flaunt this overcrowded trade. We agree but this year has been very quiet. How quiet? This year has seen its largest drawdown of only 2.8% on the S&P 500. That is a far cry from the 14% average. According to LPL, the S&P 500 has not had a drawdown of 5% or more in a calendar year only 5 times in the last 60 years and it has not happened in 30 years. NASDAQ was up 11 straight days until Friday. According to LPL’s Ryan Detrick this has happened 21 times since 1980. The next month on average for the NASDAQ is up 2.6% with 16 of those 21 being positive months.

The tapering of the Fed’s balance sheet looks to be still on schedule to start in September. The debt ceiling is scheduled to be hit in mid October. Short interest is back down to levels last seen in the second quarter of 2007 at the market peak. Equities are at the top of their new range on the S&P 500. For now we see support at 2400 on the S&P 500 with 2475 providing resistance. If they break through resistance then we are off to a new range of 2475-2550. The path of least resistance is higher for now but September looms large. The animal spirits are still in charge as long as the flow of the Fed’s balance sheet is neutral to positive.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Lucy’s Football

Remember Snoopy, Lucy, Charlie Brown and the gang in the Peanuts cartoon? There is the classic scene where Lucy convinces Charlie Brown to trust her and that she won’t take the football away again when he tries to kick it. Well, Lucy took the football away again this week. We have for months seen central banks moving closer to tightening policy and for risk to rise in the market. While members of the FOMC have been out in public in the last few weeks promising tighter policy, Janet Yellen , Chair of the FOMC, went in front of Congress this week and whispered sweet nothings in the ear of the market leading to one of the S&P’s best weeks this year.

In previous communications Yellen warned of the high valuations and the risks that are piling up as asset prices rise. She communicated to markets that financial conditions are getting out of balance and valuations are elevated. Markets seemed to accept the anticipated rate hikes along with a decreasing of the Fed’s balance sheet. Why did “Lucy” backtrack?  Markets are not headed lower. They have only slowed their ascent. Why is she panicking? This tells us all we need to know. ANY move lower in markets will be met with panic from the Federal Reserve under current leadership.

However, while the S&P 500 is having its best performance in months, underneath the surface, markets and internals are diverging. Movements among the large indexes are no longer in sync. We are seeing the large caps rise while mid and small caps refuse to play along. By way of Arthur Cashin’s Letter this week comes a warning from Jason Goepfert of SentimenTrader.

The correlation between the S&P 500 and the three other major indexes is the lowest in 10 years as they each go their own way. This kind of behavior preceded the market peaks in 2000 and 2007, back-to-back up days for the (NASDAQ) Composite while new 52-week lows grew and outnumbered new highs. That has only happened three other times – October 18, 2007, May 18, 2011, and October 27, 2014. The first two preceded major corrections while the latter led to a choppy market that set new highs then gave all the gains back.  7/11/2017

It seems as every day that goes by we read about another big name in the industry warning about a major sell off in the fall of this year. That make us nervous and not how you think. We are anticipating a selloff as well in what we have dubbed our “1987” trade. We have seen plenty of people we respect come around to our thesis. What makes us nervous is that when everyone agrees something else tends to happen.

This week it was JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon’s turn.

Central banks would like to provide certainty but “you cannot make things certain that are uncertain,”

All the main buyers of sovereign debt over the last 10 years — financial institutions, central banks, foreign exchange managers — will become net sellers now. 

“That is a very different world you have to operate in, that’s a big change in the tide,” he said. “The tide is going out.”

Ray Dalio Took his turn at the pulpit as well. We can’t help but agree with Dalio as it has been our contention since the dawn of the crisis that central bank largesse would have to end and when it did we would find that pumping money in would be a lot easier than taking it out. You can always buy in markets. You can’t always sell. That’s when risk rises and rises substantially.

For the last nine years, central banks drove interest rates to nil and pumped money into the system creating favorable carries and abundant cash. These actions pushed up asset prices… That era is ending. 

Central bankers have clearly and understandably told us that henceforth those flows from their punch bowls will be tapered rather than increase…..central bankers try to tighten at paces that are exactly right in order to keep growth and inflation neither too hot nor too cold, until they don’t get it right and we have our next downturn. Recognizing that, our responsibility now is to keep dancing but closer to the exit and with a sharp eye on the tea leaves.

Oil seems to be holding above the lows of January 2016 above $40 a barrel. Oil can’t seem to catch fire at the moment and seems range bound between $40-50 a barrel. Any time prices in the oil patch rise more supply comes on the scene. OPEC members are cheating as usual and pumping supply into the marketplace. Keep an eye on financials. Financials and oil could hold the key here. If financials rally the market will run with them. There are only about six more weeks of summer. The tapering of the Fed’s balance sheet looks to be still on schedule to start in September. We believe the market will change when the flow changes. Things are scheduled to start flowing out in September. Equities are still in the middle of the new range on the S&P 500. For now we see support at 2400 on the S&P 500 with 2475 providing resistance.   

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

The Drive Higher

The big story this week was that the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) minutes were released from its last meeting. In those minutes it becomes clear that the FOMC is looking to reduce its balance sheet. Long time readers know that we feel that it was the increase in that balance sheet that helped greatly influence the stock market rally and raise prices of virtually all asset classes in the post crisis period. Any reduction in that balance sheet would logically have the opposite effect at some point. If the FOMC were to roll off its balance sheet the valuations of equity markets, driven higher due to easy money policies, may not be able to maintain their currently elevated plateau. Earnings alone will not be able to expand market multiples.

The bottom line is that the Fed needs more weapons to fight the next recession. The Fed must reduce its balance sheet before they raise rates further. If they begin to roll off the balance sheet it becomes another weapon for them to use because they can stop and start the process or move it faster or slower. If they remain static it is a liability and not an asset.

We have been pointing towards a looming crisis in the municipal finance area. The latest on our radar is the state of Connecticut. Connecticut’s largest moneymakers have been leaving town and sticking the state with the bill. Big earners know tax law and are incentivized to leave the state for greener pastures of low tax states like Florida. Atlas is shrugging. Courtesy of zero hedge comes the following.

The latest figures showed that tax revenue from the state’s top 100 highest-paying taxpayers declined 45% from 2015 to 2016. The drop adds up to a $200 million revenue loss for Connecticut. Connecticut Tax Cut

Oil had a rough week but it did manage to crawl back and close higher on Friday. It failed to close above the critical $50 a barrel on West Texas Crude (WTI). Equities are breaking out of the range that they has been trapped in for the last 3 months. The range of 2330-2400 on the S&P 500 was broken this week as the market closed on Friday at the 2415 level. This breakout could extend to 2475 if it gets legs. For now, volume is low and the few big leaders are influencing the advance. Summer markets are more prone to sharp moves as investors head to the beach. Our main thesis still holds that the market heads higher post Donald Trump’s victory with a move much akin to 1987.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

Crackdown, Smackdown and Fever

Two areas of asset pricing that we always keep an eye on in an attempt to decipher the market’s next move are US Treasuries and the oil patch. Let’s take a look at the current oil market and the commodity sector. Falling oil prices indicate lessening demand and therefore a lagging economy. In a nasty selloff oil is now down 11% in the last 3 weeks. There are rumors of major oil focused hedge funds liquidating or taking all risk off of their books as the price of oil swiftly moves lower. All of this while copper takes a tumble too. A falling oil price (and copper for that matter) does not bode well for the economy, high yield stocks or the stock market. When we talk weak commodities our thoughts immediately turn to China. The recent selloff in the commodity sector is being linked to a tightening of monetary conditions in China. A crackdown by the Chinese government is leading to higher interest rates and a tightening of the money supply in an effort to deleverage the economy. That, in turn, leads to lower commodity prices as China is one of the world’s largest consumers of commodities. A slowdown in China needs to be on our radar.

We have also been seeing a drift lower in hard data on the US economy. This data has been dragging since the failure of Trump & Co. to repeal Obama Care the first time in March. It seems that the market is waiting on some good to come out of Washington DC. We should never count on anything to come out of Washington DC.

The market is stuck in consolidation mode. In spite of recent data on a slowing economy we still expect the market to break out of its recent range to the upside and in favor of the bulls. More often than not when a market consolidates a major move it breaks out of that pattern the same way that it came into it. It’s all about momentum and the animal spirits of the market. That would mean we break out to the upside. There are lots of negatives about like weak US data, a Chinese slowdown and massive insider selling by US Corporate executives but the market refuses to break down. Many astute investors are warning about valuations in the market and are taking down risk.  They could be forced to chase the market higher adding fuel to the fire of animal spirits.

There is currently a massive speculative fervor in the crypto currencies like Bit Coin and Ethereum. A speculative fever has broken out and it is suspected that a lot of that money is coming out of China as capital controls are implemented and from Japan where a tax on investing in crypto currencies is going to be waived soon. Please approach with caution! This market is moving fast.

This may be a bit too inside baseball but the lack of volatility is important to watch. One of the most popular trades on the street over the last few years has been to sell volatility. Massive selling of volatility compresses the price of volatility, the numbers of players executing this strategy increases with the trade’s success and it brings in more and more investors to the trade. The word is that 95% of the float in VXX (Volatility ETN) is being used to short volatility. Ladies and gentlemen 30% would be large, but 95%!! The boat is listing to port as too many investors are in on this trade. This will explode violently in their faces. We don’t know when but it will. It always does. The risk parity trade and the selling of volatility combined with the reliance on passive investing ETF’s with High Frequency Trading market makers create a structural weakness in the market and will at some point create an opportunity for those with cash when the time comes. Forewarned is forearmed.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Until Something Breaks

Until something breaks. The old Wall Street adage is 3 hikes and a stumble. In his latest webcast this week, Jeff Gundlach, the current bond maven on Wall Street, made it clear that he expects the Federal Reserve to begin a campaign of sequential interest rate hikes until “something breaks”. In Cashin’s Comments this week, Arthur notes that David Rosenberg’s (Gluskin Sheff) research shows that since World War II, the Fed has embarked on 13 tightening cycles. Ten of those cycles led to recessions. While we do not see a recession on the horizon we do believe the Fed is behind the curve and may need to hike more aggressively than they would like. That will create imbalances throughout the system much like the sequential rates hikes in 1982, 1987, 1990, 1997 and 2007. The crises ranged from the Latin American debt crisis in 1982 to the S&L crisis in 1990 to the subprime debt crisis of 2007.

The question remains, will history prove right or are things different this time? I always hesitate to say “things are different this time” because that is always the death knell. It’s like when Jim Nantz says, “this kicker hasn’t missed an extra point all season” and the kicker then goes on to botch the critical extra point.  The reality is that the Fed may be so far behind the curve that this rate hike, the third of this cycle or even the fourth rate hike doesn’t affect the market but sooner or later the Fed will hike and something will break. They are academics and they never anticipate change. It’s like driving using the rear view mirror (h/t BR). The data is from the past and doesn’t show what is happening now. They will hike until something breaks. If they do not raise rates next week the animal spirits in the market may take equity valuations even higher. The Fed is boxed in.

Valuations are quite extended and perhaps rate hikes will bring things gently back to earth. Much is being made of the idea that there seems to be a global upturn in economies. The global upturn and Trump’s policies could provide more cover for the Fed to raise rates to try and cool valuations off. You have to remember that they are not the only central bank adding fuel to the fire. Japan, China and Europe are all doing the same. We see some cracks in the foundation as High Yield and small cap stocks lagged this week. It is no surprise that high yield struggled as West Texas Crude dropped 9% on the week to finish under the psychological $50 mark.

Momentum is very powerful and still in the hands of the bulls. Lots of positives out there but things are priced for perfection. Keep an eye on crude next week. Lower crude could continue to pressure high yield. High yield and oil could be the canary in the coalmine.

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Warren Buffett’s Latest Wisdom

One thing we look forward to every year is Warren Buffett’s annual letter that comes out in February. Here is more sage long term investing advice from the Oracle of Omaha.

Moreover, the years ahead will occasionally deliver major market declines – even panics – that will affect virtually all stocks…During such scary periods, you should never forget two things: First, widespread fear is your friend as an investor, because it serves up bargain purchases. Second, personal fear is your enemy. It will also be unwarranted. Investors who avoid high and unnecessary costs and simply sit for an extended period with a collection of large, conservatively-financed American businesses will almost certainly do well.

We, at Blackthorn, as Registered Investment Advisors, have a fiduciary obligation to our clients. We are very conscious of high and unnecessary costs and how they drive down our clients returns. Patience, discipline, a well thought out investing plan and low costs. Do yourself a favor and ask your advisor to explain any and all fees that you pay. Mutual fund fees, 12b-1 fees, Brokerage fees, Investment management fees, and Wrap fees are all examples of unnecessary fees and costs.  If you are using a broker and they cannot easily and transparently list and explain your fees and costs to you then move on to someone who has a fiduciary obligation to you.

Beware the Ides of March is what you will be seeing all week in the investing media headlines. March 15th is fraught with stumbling blocks this year. A Dutch election is scheduled for this week which could move markets. More importantly, the Federal Reserve is meeting and March 15th is the day we reach a debt ceiling deadline here in the United States. The Federal Reserve will be meeting and they seem to be boxed in a corner. Rate hike odds according to Bloomberg are pushing 90%. This is the key move we have been highlighting for 2017. If the Fed does not raise rates markets may soar even higher as retail investors and animal spirits push into the market. If the Fed does raise rates it could pour some cold water on investors and slow the rally.

Retail investors are pouring into ETF’s as shown by the fact that the SPY had its largest inflow since 2014 this week and its second largest daily inflow since 2011. As per a report from CNBC company insiders are dumping stock into the marketplace at accelerated rates. For the moment caution must be heeded. Wall Street lore suggests that the third rate hike is when markets start to falter. A rate rise in March 15th would be the third rate rise of this cycle with the stated goal of two more rate hikes in 2017. History rhymes. It does not repeat. It could be different this time as we are starting from such a low level. For now, momentum is with the bulls but if retail investors are in charge things could change very quickly.

Stocks are still extremely overbought but this week they showed some slowing in their ascent. Stocks have run a long way and should stop to rest and acclimate to their new elevation. Finally, this week we saw a close in the S&P more than 1% away from its previous close. We have now not seen a move 1% lower in over 90 sessions.  Animal spirits are running high as retail investors are pouring into ETF’s like the SPY. We continue to be wary of market structure and overreliance on ETF’s. Late day marches higher in SPY are being blamed on retail buyers late to the party. Know what you own. No pushback on the idea that Germany should leave the Euro. Need to follow that one further down the rabbit hole.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

Back to the Future – 1987 and Trump

The Trump Rally continues as we expected. Given our thesis in our January Letter the possibility of a policy error by the Federal Reserve and/or the Trump Administration looks to be increasing. We believe that a policy error could set the stage for a substantial rally and then fall ala 1987. 1987 should not be looked at in fear but in anticipation of an opportunity. The table looks like it is getting set. Combine the clamor and excitement over deregulation and tax reform with a slow moving Fed and you have room for the Animal Spirits to run as investor euphoria takes hold. A 30% run from the lows before Election Day would put us squarely in Bubble territory as the S&P 500 would approach the 2750 area. A subsequent 30% retreat would bring us back to the 2000 area. Currently at 2367 on the S&P 500 one can see the potential for misstep by exiting one’s holdings completely and trying to time reentry. One solution is to dial back risk as you see markets rising and adding when the risk premium is more in your favor. Always make sure that you have the ability to buy when discounts come.

United States 10 year yields peaked at 2.6% in mid December and have been steadily falling back to the 2.3% level. We still think that the lows are in for the 10 year but the steady drip lower in yields has us concerned. The bond market is the much wiser brother of the stock market. The actions in the bond market have us thinking that investors see risk on the horizon. 2 year bond yields in Germany have reached new lows of negative (0.90%). NEGATIVE!! You buy the bonds and pay the government!

The Fed is struggling to make the March meeting look Live. The Fed has proposed that they will raise rates three times in 2017 and that just might not be possible if they do not raise rates in March. We believe March is the first key to understanding where equity markets are headed. If the Federal Reserve drags their feet and does not raise rates at the March meeting equity markets could overheat. Fed officials will then be forced to overreact at later policy meetings as they get behind the curve. The time is ripe for a policy error and markets could react swiftly.

From our good friend and mentor Arthur Cashin’s Comments February 23, 2017.

Is The Past Prologue? Maybe We Should Hope Not – The ever vigilant Jason Goepfert at SentimenTrader combed his prodigious files to see how many times the Dow closed at record highs for nine straight days. Here’s what he discovered: The Dow climbed to its 9th straight record. Going back to 1897, the index has accomplished such a feat only 5 other times. The momentum persisted in the months ahead every time, with impressive returns. But when it ended, it led to 2 crashes, 1 bear market and 1 stretch of choppiness. The five instances were 1927; 1929; 1955; 1964 and 1987. Here’s how Jason summed up his review: Like many instances of massive momentum, however, when it stopped, it stopped hard. Two of them led up to the crash in 1929, one to the crash in 1987, one to the extended bear markets of the 1960- 1970s and the other a period of extended choppy price action. So a little something for everyone there.

Momentum is towards higher prices. Stocks are extremely overbought. The S&P 500 has not seen a close of up or down more than 1% in over 50 sessions. Complacency is high. Machines seem to be running the market. Right now we are wary of market structure and overreliance on ETF’s. Know what you own. Keep an eye on bonds both here and in Europe. Europe is bubbling again. What if Germany left the euro? Discuss.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

You’ve Got Mail

Just when I thought I was out. They pull me back in.

 – Michael Corleone Godfather III

Was it Michael Corleone or James Comey Director of the FBI? Comey has to be thinking the same as the Godfather as Anthony Weiner’s emails have pulled Comey back into the Clinton investigation and thrown the election and markets for a loop. The S&P 500 was holding support above the 2130 level that we spoke of last week until the explosive news of a reopening of the Clinton email investigation hit the tape on Friday. Markets closed under 2130 for the second time triggering Jeffrey Gundlach’s warning. Monday is going to be a very important day for the short term direction of the market.

Mega mergers are not typically seen as very good for markets. In fact they usually serve as a warning post and signs of a potential top. We were served up with the news of three merger/takeovers last Monday morning. The largest being the ATT Time Warner deal. The AOL Time Warner deal served as the warning bell at the top of the 2000 bull market and the subsequent tech crash. When large companies have squeezed the last drop of growth out of their companies and the business cycle is near the top the playbook calls for buying growth. At the end of the business cycle the only thing left to do is acquire the growth that is not obtainable organically. ATT has recently seen a slowdown in the growth of subscribers. Is this the Hail Mary Pass for ATT? The AOL Time Warner merger is now studied in business classes as the classic failed mega merger. How will history see the ATT Time Warner merger? Better we suspect but sometimes they do ring bells at the top.

As far as the technicals go the 50 Day Moving Average (DMA) on the S&P 500 is now declining. Also, the last two weeks have seen market swoons instead of rallies at the end of the market day. Both serve as warning signs for a tired market. We are entering, which is historically, the best part of the year for stocks. The election and the Federal Reserve may have something to say about that. We are now staring at an election in chaos and a Federal Reserve committee meeting in December where they have all but promised the market that they will raise rates. Will they still raise rates if Trump wins and markets swoon? 2130 is being tested. Pass or fail?

The S&P 500 has now closed below its 100 day moving average for the third straight week. If 2130 fails then the next real level of support is the always critical 200 day moving average at 2078 on the S&P 500.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

The End of the World

The end of the world is a terribly bad bet but yet television pundits were out in force last week proclaiming the beginning of a bear market and perhaps the end of the world as we know it. The definition of a bear market is a market that is down 20% from its highs. At the S&P 500’s lows last week the market was already down 15%. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to predict that the market has a 50/50 chance of going down another 5%.

The reason that the pundits are out and about screaming like Chicken Little is that they were not prepared for a move lower in asset prices. We, on the other hand, had lowered our equity allocations and raised our cash position. That way we were prepared to outperform given a sharp move lower while having excess cash to deploy given better valuations and cheaper assets. Being an asset manager is a lot like being in charge of buying the groceries. If one is in charge of buying the groceries you haven’t done your job appropriately if when going to the grocery store and finding New York Strip marked down 15% you don’t have any cash in your pocket.

We have been underweight equities and overweight cash for some time now seeing an overvaluation in asset prices. This overvaluation in asset prices coupled with the unintended negative consequences of the Federal Reserve’s zero interest rate policy led us to surmise that a re-pricing of assets was in order. While underweight equities at that time we did not feel as though we would miss any truly outstanding returns. Given stretched equity valuations it seemed far better for us to have some insurance in case markets headed lower. Markets go down far faster than they go up and any underperformance is quickly made up with an outsized cash position. Suffice to say 2016 has been a boon to relative performance if one was prepared for this correction in the markets.

Howard Marks latest missive came across my desk this week and as my long time readers know I read everything from Mr. Marks that I can find. He is one of the great investing minds of our time and is kind enough to share his thoughts on investing. Mr. Marks has warned for some time that valuations were a bit rich by telling us to “move forward, but with caution”. It is now that he sees better values. While not saying that now is THE time to buy he does mention that now may be A time to buy.

As I mentioned above, since the middle of 2011 – by which time the quest for return had resulted in rather full prices for debt, over-generous capital markets and pro-risk investor behavior – Oaktree’s mantra has been “move forward, but with caution.”  We’ve felt it was right to invest in our markets, but also that our investments had to reflect a healthy dose of prudence.

Now, as discussed above, investors’ optimism has deflated a bit, some negativity has come into the equation, and prices have moved lower.  Depending importantly on which market we’re talking about and how it has fared in recent months, we consider it appropriate to move forward with a little less caution. – Howard Marks

 

We have fielded a larger number of calls this week from concerned clients and we take our role as counselor seriously.  Being in tune with one’s emotions is probably the most important criteria for investing success. As a former specialist on the NYSE it was our job to be a provider of contra liquidity. That is to say it was our job to be buying when others were selling and selling when others were buying. It was a great training ground to understand one’s own emotions and of the potential madness in crowds. It trained me to have a contrarian viewpoint. When confronted with excessive buying or selling by market participants it naturally became an instinct to question the extreme nature of the emotions driving that buying or selling.  It is not to say that the crowd was always wrong or that we do not feel the emotions of fear and greed. It is that we are keenly aware in that moment to be objective in our approach and to recognize when there is fear or panic in the sellers mind and act appropriately. By being aware of one’s emotions one can more easily use others fear or greed to profit.

That’s one of the crazy things: in the real world, things generally fluctuate between “pretty good” and “not so hot.”  But in the world of investing, perception often swings from “flawless” to “hopeless.”  The pendulum careens from one extreme to the other, spending almost no time at “the happy medium” and rather little in the range of reasonableness.  First there’s denial, and then there’s capitulation. Howard Marks – Oaktree

The same concern seemed to be repeated one every client call this week. “Is this 2008 all over again?” Quite frankly, I don’t believe so. I think that this situation is different. I think that most investors are suffering from recency bias. Recency bias is the tendency to think that trends and patterns that have happened in the recent past will occur again. Investors burned by the 50% downturn in the Internet Bubble of 2000 and the 50% downturn in the Housing Bubble of 2008 are afraid that we are at that same precipice again. I do not have a crystal ball but I do not see the same excesses in current markets as I saw in 2000 and 2008 but I do see investors preparing for a coming storm. If investors are prepared then the storm effects will not be as bad as when they were not prepared in 2000 and 2008. Furthermore, it is our perception that there are overvaluations that need to be corrected but not bubble type excesses. Even in the oil sector there were not bubble like valuations but just simply a misallocation of resources due to Federal Reserve zero interest rate policy. The negative implications of which have obviously come to pass. It also seems that while the bursting of the Housing Bubble in 2008 did bring us to the brink of a global meltdown that was mostly due to the weak balance sheets of US banks. That is no longer the issue that it was in 2008 as the Federal Reserve has made sure that bank balance sheets, at least here in the US, are much less vulnerable than they were in 2008.

So let’s all back away from the ledge. It is not the end of the world as we know it. If we can understand our fear and use it to our advantage we will be better off for it in the long run. We are positioned appropriately and looking for that New York Strip to go on sale.  We will continue to maintain albeit somewhat higher levels of cash as equity valuations continue to become more reasonable and put those dry powder funds to work. We think it will be prudent to avoid exposure to momentum stocks and continue to rotate into more reasonably valued shares.

 

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.