Anyone Have a Match?

The debt ceiling is coming! The debt ceiling is coming! Not quite Paul Revere but the Treasury market is showing signs that investors are getting concerned about the debt ceiling being reached in mid October as the CBO has warned. If Republicans can’t get a bill through that they have been working on for seven years how will they get the debt ceiling passed through the most polarized congress in history? Months ago we were looking at sweeping changes with the Republicans controlling both houses. Now, instead of tax reform, we are looking at a government shutdown. For once, gridlock in DC may not be so good.

We have been postulating for years that the reason that the economy is not doing well is that interest rates are too low and that there was no threat that interest rates would go higher. Think about it. There has been no incentive to borrow and buy a car, a home or invest in plant and factory. We can “put it off until next year” because we aren’t sure about the economy and rates aren’t going anywhere. We came across this blog post from Epsilon Theory and Dr. Ben Hunt. It is not the common thinking but that is usually where the answer lies.

The reason companies aren’t investing more aggressively in plant and equipment and technology is BECAUSE we have the most accommodative monetary policy in the history of the world, with the easiest money to borrow that corporations have ever seen. Why in the world would management take the risk — and it’s definitely a risk — of investing for real growth when they are so awash in easy money that they can beat their earnings guidance with a risk-free stock buyback?

(As the Fed slowly raises rates) It will force companies to take on more risk. It will force companies to invest more in plant and equipment and technology. It will force companies to pay up for the skilled workers they need.

In exactly the same way that QE was deflationary in practice when it was inflationary in theory, so will the end of QE be inflationary in practice when it is deflationary in theory.

My view: as the tide of QE goes out, the tide of inflation comes in. And the more that the QE tide recedes, the more inflation comes in.

Dr. Ben Hunt Epsilon Theory 

I agree with Dr Hunt that at some point central bankers may be asking – Why is inflation accelerating as we raise rates? How come we cannot contain inflation? In talking to business leaders over the last several years we have not seen many talking up their industry as “hitting on all cylinders”. Last month we spent some time with a leader in the medical device field which he says is booming. Industry players are borrowing for plant and equipment for the first time in years. Combine some tax reform with higher rates and BINGO! That joint is jumping. Central bankers have been pouring gasoline on the pyre for years with no effect. Pushing on a string. Higher rates may be the match and with too much gasoline on the fire inflation may be the result.

Markets have been quiet. A little too quiet. We have read story after story about the volatility trade and how volatility has to spike higher to flaunt this overcrowded trade. We agree but this year has been very quiet. How quiet? This year has seen its largest drawdown of only 2.8% on the S&P 500. That is a far cry from the 14% average. According to LPL, the S&P 500 has not had a drawdown of 5% or more in a calendar year only 5 times in the last 60 years and it has not happened in 30 years. NASDAQ was up 11 straight days until Friday. According to LPL’s Ryan Detrick this has happened 21 times since 1980. The next month on average for the NASDAQ is up 2.6% with 16 of those 21 being positive months.

The tapering of the Fed’s balance sheet looks to be still on schedule to start in September. The debt ceiling is scheduled to be hit in mid October. Short interest is back down to levels last seen in the second quarter of 2007 at the market peak. Equities are at the top of their new range on the S&P 500. For now we see support at 2400 on the S&P 500 with 2475 providing resistance. If they break through resistance then we are off to a new range of 2475-2550. The path of least resistance is higher for now but September looms large. The animal spirits are still in charge as long as the flow of the Fed’s balance sheet is neutral to positive.

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I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Investors Spooky October

While October has traditionally been a spooky month for investors the only thing scaring investors this October was the huge gains in the stock market. October 2015 will go down as the best performing month for the S&P 500 in four years.  I think that we all enjoyed the ride back up in October. The S&P 500 rallied 8.3% and followed through with more gains today to get the S&P 500 into the plus column for 2015. Those gains would be nice gains for an entire year – never mind a month! Whenever we get to thinking how much we have gained we cannot help but to contemplate the downside. We must always be on guard to temper our greed/ego just as much as we would concentrate on opportunity when fear strikes.

Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful. – Warren Buffett

While the S&P 500 has moved back into the trading range that it occupied in the first half of 2015 it that would indicate that, at the very least, the market is due for a breather. We believe that the current upside in the market is therefore limited and that a pullback is not only likely but healthy for continued market gains. We are concerned about the lag in Small Cap stocks and what that may indicate for the market in the near term. We saw an exciting rise in Large Cap indexes in October but their Small Cap brethren have not kept pace. Usually, that signals a weakness in the market as investors flock to the relative safety that Large Cap stocks provide rather than seek out the higher risk/reward paradigm of small cap growth. This anomaly could also indicate a near term change in direction of stocks.

The current general consensus is for the market to make further gains as the traditional Santa Claus rally appears into the end of the year. We believe that the October rally has brought forward much of those gains and further gains into the end of the year will be muted. We would expect the market to take a breather and settle into a trading range as we close out 2015. It is a little early to foresee what 2016 holds in store but given the volatility that we have since August of this year we believe that 2016 will continue in the same vein and be a volatile year. While higher volatility does not indicate a top for the market higher volatility does tend to appear in the last act of an aging bull market. We could be seeing a market that compares in time to the 1999-2000 market when the Federal Reserve was preparing to raise interest rates.  We believe that 2016’s returns will be +/- 20% for the year. Not very exact or comforting but it does allow us to plan. That plan would include more and larger tactical moves than we have made in the recent past.

“What you saw in the third quarter of this year could well have been a harbinger of things to come over the next year or two,” Bruce Karsh, CIO and cochairman of Oaktree Capital Group said October 29 after the company reported earnings. 

We cannot predict with 100% accuracy every move in the market but what we can do is try and profit by tactically allocating and hedging our portfolio in times of market stress to take advantage of market volatility. Investing is not a game of perfection but of managing the risk inside one’s portfolio. We do not jump in and jump out of the market wholesale. By divesting ourselves of overpriced assets and availing ourselves of opportunities when prices are low allows us to take advantage of the long term benefits that the math of compounding brings.

I think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.