The Great Escape

It is a 10 year anniversary for us this week. This week marks 10 years since our move to Georgia. It also marks the 10th anniversary of the dawn of the financial crisis. Not a coincidence I assure you. Having traded through the Internet Bubble and watched Lucent Technologies, which was that bubbles’ “Darling” stock, trade from $79 to 79 cents we knew the real estate market would have also have to get as bad as it was good. And in 2006 -07 it was very good. We foresaw the real estate crisis and sold our house in New Jersey for an exorbitant price which according to Zillow it still has not climbed back to. As a side note, Lucent never got back to $79 either. We say this not to brag but as an investment lesson learned well. Trees do not grow to the sky. Know when to cut back on your risk.

Not much is being made of the 10th Anniversary of the Great Financial Crisis (GFC) but there has been a lot of consternation surrounding the Federal Reserve’s most recent decision and path going forward. If we have established that the growth in central bank balance sheets around the world has been responsible for the run up in asset prices it stands to reason that any shrinking of those balance sheets would diminish asset prices. Here is another timeless lesson of investing. Never fight the Fed. While the Fed has spent the last 10 years injecting liquidity into the system to pump up asset prices it is now talking about taking liquidity out – Quantitative Tightening (QT). Ironically, during our time on Wall Street the phrase QT was a questionable trade, an error that needed to be resolved and it usually cost you money. The question facing us now is the Federal Reserve making a questionable trade and will it cost you money?

The economy is growing, albeit slowing. That is due to the immense amount of debt on the United States balance sheet. This slow growth is now being met by a central bank that seeks to raise rates and shrink its own balance sheet. Now instead of a tailwind, the economy and markets are looking at a headwind. As we have written in prior posts, the Federal Reserve could have been acting since December with the impulse that more stimulative fiscal policy was going to come out of Washington, in the post election period. The new administration Trumpeted the advent of a new era with tax reform and deregulation at its forefront. The Fed sought to get ahead of the curve by applying tighter money policy. Well, Washington is at a standstill and has provided none of the above.

Is the Federal Reserve making the ultimate central banker mistake? Are they tightening into a slowdown? The bond market seems to think so. The yield curve is flattening which indicates that bond investors do not see inflation on the horizon and see subpar growth in the economy. Yet the stock market keeps chugging along. Who is right? Generally, we always go with the bond market.  We believe that the Fed is tightening due to financial conditions and not economic conditions. That is what the stock market is missing. As long as the market expects the Fed to stop tightening because of slowing economic conditions then the market will continue to rally and the Fed will continue raising rates. Someone is going to blink first.

We think that the animal spirits playbook is still alive. Markets have not broken down and still seem to be headed higher. Higher markets may force investors to chase it even higher.

The Federal Reserve’s thinking has two main problems. One is that the Fed believes in stock and not flow which means that the Fed believes a big balance sheet helps the market. We believe it is the flow that determines the direction of markets. Flow is the direction in which the Fed and policy are headed. The Fed also believes that the market will discount their talking points as they move towards QT. We believe that the market will change when the flow changes.

Oil continues to get pounded as it is down 20% from March highs even though things in the Middle East heat up. Oil may try to find a bottom here as oil production will slow below $40 a barrel, at least here in the US. Biotech has had a great week as investors rotate there as the pressure from Washington on that sector seems to have ebbed. Equities are still in the middle of what we anticipate to be the new range on the S&P 500. For now we see support at 2400 on the S&P 500 with 2475 providing resistance. Interest rates may have seen their interim low for awhile.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Cross Your Fingers

The parade of famous money managers coming out to proclaim that asset valuations are too high continues. This week’s contestants included Paul Singer of Elliott Management and Bill Gross from Janus funds. Speaking at the Bloomberg Invest summit in New York, Bill Gross proclaimed that in regard to US markets as an investor you are “buying high and crossing your fingers”. Bloomberg

Singer had the following to say:

“I don’t think that the fixes that have been put into place have actually created a sound financial system. I don’t believe that confidence is justified in policy makers and central bankers.”

If and when confidence is lost, it could be lost in a very abrupt fashion causing conceivably a ruckus in bond markets, stock markets and in financial institutions.” – Paul Singer

While we agree with the parade of money managers that markets are overvalued, overly complacent and apathetic to growing risks, until markets recognize those risks, assets prices will continue to rise. Here is our next level of thinking on the subject. Singer has just raised $5 billion in ready cash and he is anxious to deploy it. He, like other underinvested money managers, needs lower prices. We think that the animal spirits playbook is still alive. Markets have not broken down and still seem to be headed higher. Higher markets may force investors to chase it even higher.

While there was plenty of potential for fireworks as we came into the week it went out with a real thud. Most eyes were on Thursday and the Comey congressional testimony but it was Friday that provided the only action of the week. In a week that saw the world’s largest natural gas supplier, Qatar, being cut off from supplies and creating food shortages in one of the richest nations on earth, markets didn’t even blink. While the much hyped James Comey testimony and a hung parliament in the United Kingdom election didn’t move markets it was a reevaluation of tech stock prices on Friday that gave the week any life at all. The fireworks were provided by Face book, Amazon and Apple. The street has been making noise that the high flying tech stocks needed a breather and they got that breather on Friday. The key is will we see a real rotation out of tech and growth and into value stocks and the 2017 YTD laggards. We will see next week if that is what we have in store for the summer of 2017.

Equities are still in the middle of what we anticipate to be the new range on the S&P 500. For now we see support at 2400 on the S&P 500 with 2475 providing resistance. Interest rates may have seen their interim low for awhile. Financials and energy were the standout performers on Friday with small and mid cap stocks getting a day in the sun. Small and mid cap stocks have lagged so far in 2017.Perhaps they have further to run if this rotation continues.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

The Sun Also Rises

How did you go bankrupt? Two ways. Gradually and then suddenly. – Ernest Hemingway The Sun Also Rises

We have been pointing towards a looming crisis in the municipal finance area. No, this is not a repeat from last week when we talked about the fiscal problems in the great state of Connecticut. It was Illinois’ turn this week to make headlines. The two big ratings agencies, Moody’s and S&P lowered their rating on Illinois to one step above junk as its budget impasse dragged onward. Illinois will likely reach junk status by July of this year. It is now the lowest rated US state ever.

Big banks are complaining that their profit’s are drying up and this is mostly due to Federal Reserve polices. The yield curve is flattening which is stymieing bank’s ability to make money on loans while volatility in markets has dried up pinching trading profits. JP Morgan, Bank of America and Morgan Stanley all warned on profits this week as trading profits are blamed. We expect the Federal Reserve to heed their calls. The yield curve problem may take longer to solve but we should expect the Fed to allow for more volatility in markets. JP Morgan warned on trading in May of 2014. The market continued to march higher another 9% into December of that year.

The head of one of the largest asset managers on the planet, BlackRock’s’ Larry Fink, warned the equity market is not appreciating the message from the Treasury yield curve and we have to agree. The bond market continues to rally with the US 10 Year yielding a paltry 2.15% at week’s end. It is a caution sign that both the bond and stock markets are rallying while the yield curve flattens. Investors may be chasing the stock market a bit as there seems to be some evidence of FOMO. Fear of Missing Out as the market hits new highs. The laggards from 2017 YTD rallied this week and that tells us that money managers are chasing. This plays right into our animal spirits theory and the 1987 scenario. History doesn’t repeat but human beings are susceptible to making the same mistakes over and over again.

Oil had another rough week as it is still below the critical $50 a barrel on West Texas Crude (WTI). New pension and retirement money entered the market as the calendar flipped to the month of June. Equities have broken out of the range that they had been trapped in for the last 3 months. The range of 2330-2400 on the S&P 500 was broken last week and the market extended its move to just below 2440. We expect this breakout to extend to 2475.  For now, volume is low and the trend is your friend.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

The Drive Higher

The big story this week was that the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) minutes were released from its last meeting. In those minutes it becomes clear that the FOMC is looking to reduce its balance sheet. Long time readers know that we feel that it was the increase in that balance sheet that helped greatly influence the stock market rally and raise prices of virtually all asset classes in the post crisis period. Any reduction in that balance sheet would logically have the opposite effect at some point. If the FOMC were to roll off its balance sheet the valuations of equity markets, driven higher due to easy money policies, may not be able to maintain their currently elevated plateau. Earnings alone will not be able to expand market multiples.

The bottom line is that the Fed needs more weapons to fight the next recession. The Fed must reduce its balance sheet before they raise rates further. If they begin to roll off the balance sheet it becomes another weapon for them to use because they can stop and start the process or move it faster or slower. If they remain static it is a liability and not an asset.

We have been pointing towards a looming crisis in the municipal finance area. The latest on our radar is the state of Connecticut. Connecticut’s largest moneymakers have been leaving town and sticking the state with the bill. Big earners know tax law and are incentivized to leave the state for greener pastures of low tax states like Florida. Atlas is shrugging. Courtesy of zero hedge comes the following.

The latest figures showed that tax revenue from the state’s top 100 highest-paying taxpayers declined 45% from 2015 to 2016. The drop adds up to a $200 million revenue loss for Connecticut. Connecticut Tax Cut

Oil had a rough week but it did manage to crawl back and close higher on Friday. It failed to close above the critical $50 a barrel on West Texas Crude (WTI). Equities are breaking out of the range that they has been trapped in for the last 3 months. The range of 2330-2400 on the S&P 500 was broken this week as the market closed on Friday at the 2415 level. This breakout could extend to 2475 if it gets legs. For now, volume is low and the few big leaders are influencing the advance. Summer markets are more prone to sharp moves as investors head to the beach. Our main thesis still holds that the market heads higher post Donald Trump’s victory with a move much akin to 1987.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

Trump Troubles

A roller coaster runs up and down spins around and around while finishing where you started and it probably cost you money. – Arthur Cashin

We all rode the rollercoaster this week.  While there was plenty of noise and bluster the market fell less than one half of one percent this week. We feel that the volatility in the market was more about the massive positioning of trader’s being short volatility and not as much about Trump. Trump is just the excuse. Could this be a warning shot across the bow in the crowded volatility trade? Perhaps. Be careful. We are entering a slow period for the market seasonally. There just aren’t as many players around during the summer months and moves could become more pronounced. I, for one, would welcome back some volatility. It keeps investors onsides.

Financials are very important to the bullishness of the US stock market. The yield curve is flattening. That means that the bond market sees the economy slowing and the prospect of higher rates on the long end decreasing. The Fed will not be able to continue to raise rates if the economy is faltering. Financials are probably the most important sector of the stock market. Without financials it is hard to get the index to extend higher. The market is pricing in a June rate hike but chances are diminishing that the Fed will be able to raise rates a third time in 2017. Trump’s troubles make a fiscal bump less likely. If you have followed our blog you know that we made the case that a Trump bump from fiscal stimulus would give the Fed cover to raise rates. If that gets lost in the swamp then it makes the Fed’s job a lot more difficult. Our next point of interest is the Fed’s balance sheet. They are making noise that shrinking it is becoming a priority. That will be a huge factor in 2018.

West Texas crude was able to hold its recent lows and was able to close this week above the psychologically important $50 a barrel level. It could be just a bounce off of the OPEC meeting and Russian compliance or we could be seeing more growth worldwide. Oil has a top on it as if crude goes higher as more shale players will come online capping the price of oil but it is worth watching as an indicator of growth around the world.

Given all that happened this week the market is still stuck in consolidation mode. Emerging markets and Europe have been the place to be but Brazil took a hard shot this week. Keep an eye on Brazil. Impeachment is a strong word. Given the very small sample of US Presidents that have been on the impeachment trail stock markets have not reacted negatively in the longer term based on the impeachment process. Having said that, impeachment is also not likely given that Republicans control the House, that is until the midterm elections in 2018.  It is hard to argue against the bull thesis as the market continues to hold its recent range of 2330-2400 on the S&P 500. Until we break decidedly below 2330 we hold on to the bullish thesis.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Published in: on May 20, 2017 at 8:24 am  Leave a Comment  
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Gradual Squeeze

Local governments are in serious trouble as we are now seeing in Puerto Rico and Connecticut. High taxes, capital flight and pension obligations are going to meet the new order. We see technology and social changes on the horizon that continue to cut out the middle man and the ultimate middle man is government. Driverless cars? No more speeding tickets, DUI’s, parking tickets and lower drug arrests from stopped vehicles. All bring in less revenue for your local and state government. About seven years ago Meredith Whitney offered that muni defaults would begin to rise. She was laughed out of the building.

Ray Dalio is CEO of Bridgewater Associates, one of the largest hedge funds in the world. Ray takes into account not just the numbers as his theories about investing are more all encompassing about where we are in the cycles of debt and the economy while taking into account social and political factors. In his latest blog post on LinkedIn he had this to say on the current environment. We have taken Ray’s thoughts and applied them to muni bond investing. Time to think about a gradual squeeze in muni’s and rising default rates?  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/big-picture-ray-dalio

At the same time, the longer-term picture is concerning because we have a lot of debt and a lot of non-debt obligations (pensions, healthcare entitlements, social security, etc.) coming due, which will increasingly create a “squeeze”; this squeeze will come gradually, not as a shock, and will hurt those who are now most in distress the hardest.

Central banks’ powers to rectify these problems are more limited than normal, which adds to the downside risks. Central banks’ powers to ease are less than normal because they have limited abilities to lower interest rates from where they are and because increased QE would be less effective than normal with risk premiums where they are. Similarly, effective fiscal policy help is more elusive because of political fragmentation.

Wells Fargo’s unauthorized account scandal is growing. It is now estimated that they created over 3.5 million accounts. If you are still with a traditional broker and not a fiduciary you should ask yourself, “Why?”

Commodities continue to have a rough go of it. Iron ore, copper, and rubber are all well off of their highs with iron ore down 20% and rubber down 30%. The tightening of money in China is having a chilling effect on commodity prices around the globe. West Texas Crude (WTI) rose about 3% on the week but is still under the crucial $50 a barrel mark. Keep an eye on oil for clues about the economy and stock market. The Saudi’s are looking to IPO their precious Saudi Aramco, the largest oil company in the world, and are going to want oil prices higher in order to get more money into their treasury. The Iranians and the Russians may try and pump more oil in order to push prices lower as their interests run counter to the Saudi’s. OPEC meets on May 25th. Oil has been on a roller coaster in 2017 and we do not think that the second half of the year will be any different.

The market is still stuck in consolidation mode. The S&P 500’s leadership continues to help pull the index higher while the amount of stocks above their 50 day moving average drops from 80% to 50%. Things are getting narrow at the top. This could be another sign that investors should be adding active management back into their portfolio. Stock trends continue as Hong Kong, England, Brazil, Japan, and the US all continue to consolidate gains or head higher. China? Not so much. Hard to argue against the bull thesis as the market continue to hold gains or plow higher. We think a southern neighbor could be the next leading stock market.

We still expect the market to break out of its recent range to the upside and in favor of the bulls. More often than not when a market consolidates a major move it breaks out of that pattern the same way that it came into it. It’s all about momentum and the animal spirits of the market.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

 

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

 

Published in: on May 13, 2017 at 8:51 am  Leave a Comment  
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Crackdown, Smackdown and Fever

Two areas of asset pricing that we always keep an eye on in an attempt to decipher the market’s next move are US Treasuries and the oil patch. Let’s take a look at the current oil market and the commodity sector. Falling oil prices indicate lessening demand and therefore a lagging economy. In a nasty selloff oil is now down 11% in the last 3 weeks. There are rumors of major oil focused hedge funds liquidating or taking all risk off of their books as the price of oil swiftly moves lower. All of this while copper takes a tumble too. A falling oil price (and copper for that matter) does not bode well for the economy, high yield stocks or the stock market. When we talk weak commodities our thoughts immediately turn to China. The recent selloff in the commodity sector is being linked to a tightening of monetary conditions in China. A crackdown by the Chinese government is leading to higher interest rates and a tightening of the money supply in an effort to deleverage the economy. That, in turn, leads to lower commodity prices as China is one of the world’s largest consumers of commodities. A slowdown in China needs to be on our radar.

We have also been seeing a drift lower in hard data on the US economy. This data has been dragging since the failure of Trump & Co. to repeal Obama Care the first time in March. It seems that the market is waiting on some good to come out of Washington DC. We should never count on anything to come out of Washington DC.

The market is stuck in consolidation mode. In spite of recent data on a slowing economy we still expect the market to break out of its recent range to the upside and in favor of the bulls. More often than not when a market consolidates a major move it breaks out of that pattern the same way that it came into it. It’s all about momentum and the animal spirits of the market. That would mean we break out to the upside. There are lots of negatives about like weak US data, a Chinese slowdown and massive insider selling by US Corporate executives but the market refuses to break down. Many astute investors are warning about valuations in the market and are taking down risk.  They could be forced to chase the market higher adding fuel to the fire of animal spirits.

There is currently a massive speculative fervor in the crypto currencies like Bit Coin and Ethereum. A speculative fever has broken out and it is suspected that a lot of that money is coming out of China as capital controls are implemented and from Japan where a tax on investing in crypto currencies is going to be waived soon. Please approach with caution! This market is moving fast.

This may be a bit too inside baseball but the lack of volatility is important to watch. One of the most popular trades on the street over the last few years has been to sell volatility. Massive selling of volatility compresses the price of volatility, the numbers of players executing this strategy increases with the trade’s success and it brings in more and more investors to the trade. The word is that 95% of the float in VXX (Volatility ETN) is being used to short volatility. Ladies and gentlemen 30% would be large, but 95%!! The boat is listing to port as too many investors are in on this trade. This will explode violently in their faces. We don’t know when but it will. It always does. The risk parity trade and the selling of volatility combined with the reliance on passive investing ETF’s with High Frequency Trading market makers create a structural weakness in the market and will at some point create an opportunity for those with cash when the time comes. Forewarned is forearmed.

If you are not currently receiving our blog by email you can sign up for free at https://terencereilly.wordpress.com/ .

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com  or check out our LinkedIn page at https://www.linkedin.com/in/terencereilly/ .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

1987?

Most investors are primarily oriented toward return, how much they can make and pay little attention to risk, how much they can lose.”

— Seth Klarman

Every week I read Steve Blumenthal’s from CMG Capital Management’s letter On My Radar . It is an excellent source of insights and research that Steve’s puts out every week. I really admire Steve’s style, wit and ideas on the investing universe. This week he mentions a quote attributed to Seth Klarman. We read everything we see from or about Seth as he is an investing legend. The quote struck us this morning as we had conversations this week with two of our more aggressive clients. They are able to be aggressive because they push risk to the back of their minds and continue to push forward and focus on returns. They have both been very aggressive from the financial crisis in 2008 until this week. Coincidentally, both have backed off and are ready to take some risk off of the table. Anecdotal I know, but, I think that it does have some value as it seems that a wide swath of investors now see the market as fully valued. What does that mean? The second level of thinking tells us that the market, since the market has been able to hold an overvalued level it could have further to run. Investors have pulled some risk out waiting for markets to take a breather and give them a better entry point – which it has not. They may be pulled back in chasing prices higher. We believe the animal spirits still have control of this market. The Trump Trade is still moving forward. Could tax reform be the “sell the news” event?

Our biggest question outside a possible shutdown of the federal government is about inflation. No. Not North Korea. I think the media has pumped that one enough. Inflation is our focus as some reports indicate this week that wage inflation could be on the rise. Wage inflation here in the United States could keep the Fed raising rates even while the economy sputters. The yield curve continues to flatten which is not good news for the banks while oil seems to be holding below $50 a barrel. Neither is good news for the market and bad news for both sectors makes it harder for the overall market to rally. These are two huge sectors; percentage wise, for the market and their reluctance to rally makes it harder for the tide to lift other boats. It also makes the any rally narrower with the likes of Apple, Amazon and Google leading the charge.

French election results give the ECB and the Federal Reserve the green light to be more aggressive in tightening policy. Inflation is also a green light. The pressure is building on central banks to take away the punchbowl. North Korea has the media on edge but I am more worried about inflation and Congress shutting down the government. The market is counting on movement out of Washington on healthcare and tax reform. It is never a good idea to count on Washington.

Mario Gabelli made mention that a 1987 style event could happen again this year. We do not disagree. We believe the market structure is in place that could lead to a moment where markets collapse quickly and temporarily. We believe it will be an opportunity for courageous investors but it will also be quick as there is a still a lot of money sloshing around markets looking for a home. Market is still stuck in its range for now between 2330 – 2400 on the S&P 500. Our thesis since last October has been a Triumph win followed by a 30% rally with an equivalent selloff in the fall of 2017 much like 1987. Markets are still following that script.

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

 

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Published in: on April 29, 2017 at 6:16 am  Leave a Comment  
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Behind Closed Doors

Known for being press shy, unlike some hedge fund managers, Paul Tudor Jones broke onto the trading scene with a splash by calling the 1987 stock market crash just days before it happened. So it was big news this week when it was revealed that Paul Tudor Jones, at a closed door meeting this week at Goldman Sachs, said that the Federal Reserve should be freaked out by this one “terrifying chart”. The chart in question also happens to be Warren Buffett’s primary indicator of market valuations.

It makes for good headlines but we have to say we have followed this chart for years and it is not a very good timing indicator for market corrections. However, it is a very good guide to the valuation of the overall market here in the Unites States and it is quite high. Market s can stay irrational longer than you can remain solvent betting against them. Interest rates and ballooning central bank balance sheets have pushed asset prices around the world to new heights.

It remains to be considered that IF central banks ever stop buying or, god forbid sell, then markets should fall. More interestingly, Jones said that the catalyst to the market fall will be risk parity funds. A bit inside baseball but, basically, the explosion of risk parity funds is based on momentum. The lower the market goes the more risk parity funds will have to sell equities. It could exacerbate any run in the market just as it has on the upside. :

We have been weighing in on the active vs. passive debate in the last few weeks as we feel that we have reached an inflection point. We believe that the pendulum swings back when it reaches extremes and we believe that we may be at that point. Think of it like this.  If everyone is invested 100% in ETF’s, passive management, then wouldn’t it be prudent to employ an active allocation to try and capture what inefficiencies are created by blindly piling en masse into ETF’s. We have been vocal proponents of the benefits of passive management but the pendulum may have swung too far and more evidence, however anecdotal, was presented this week by the creation of an ETF for ETF’s. An exchange traded fund (ETF) was created this week to follow the companies that benefit from the growth in the ETF industry. Maybe sometimes they do ring a bell. Time for more research.

Congress has been closed so the Trump Reflation obsession was put on hold and investors and media grew obsessed with geopolitical concerns with a spotlight on the French elections and North Korea.  Rates are falling while gold is rising. Fear is rising as some are reaching for protection in what is known as the “fear trade”. A move to gold and US Treasuries is the usually accompaniment when fear rises, especially in light of geopolitical concerns. Investors have become a bit more defensive. We may see rates rise and gold fall when Congress gets back into session.

Last 30 minutes of trading thesis has been inconclusive so far. No definitive pattern yet. Market seems to be in a consolidation pattern. The market seems to be digesting its gains and gathering itself before a move to a higher summit. Markets do not top out like this – spending weeks at a given level. The odds are that markets, when leaving a consolidation phase, move in the direction in which they came in.

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.

Published in: on April 22, 2017 at 6:31 am  Leave a Comment  
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WW III

We felt in recent months that there were too many people on the one side of the boat. That “side of the boat” was investors heavily shorting US Treasuries are they prepared for the Federal Reserve to raise rates three times this year. When everyone thinks something will happen you can almost guarantee that something else will. The 10 year closed Thursday at 2.23%. While a lot of because of geopolitical concerns and the long weekend we still think investors are too short Treasuries. This could be the last move lower in Treasuries as the short sellers’ force yields lower to cover their shorts and stop their pain. For now, we are still long duration but looking to sell into strength.

The last 30 minutes of trading have been abysmal. Four out of the last 5 trading sessions markets have moved lower in the last 30 minutes. We postulated in recent posts that the last 30 minutes are the “tell” in the market right now. Thursday was exacerbated by geopolitics and the long weekend so next week will help make that clue a bit more solid. Keep an eye on the last 30 minutes as that may be our best clue as to the near term direction of the market.

Strange week. Congress went out on Easter recess and so investors and the media began to focus (perhaps obsess) on geopolitics. The beneficiaries were the usual suspects of bonds and precious metals. Let’s see how things play out early next week if WW III doesn’t manage to break out this weekend.

Another week and another famous hedge fund manager is giving money back to clients. We take this as a sign that we could be at or near an inflection point. Jeff Ubben is a highly respected hedge fund manager and is giving 10% of his fund back to clients. He is finding it difficult to find value in this market. Valuations are stretched.

Active vs. Passive management has not been much of a fight over the last decade but we think that there are signs that perhaps we should be tilting more in the direction of adding some more active management. One of the headlines in Barron’s this weekend is “Can Humans Still Beat the Market”. This week Pennsylvania’s elected treasurer announced he is moving $1B from active to passive management to save $5M in fees. Treasurer Moving to Passive Investments

We know the argument all too well. Active is less predictable. It is more costly. It also pathetically tax inefficient. We think that investors have become too blind buying the whole market and there is room for active. The pendulum will swing back. We are diving back into researching for the active players who will outperform.

I  think we aspire less to foresee the future and more to be a great contingency planner… you can respond very fast to what’s happening because you thought through all the possibilities, – Lloyd  Blankfein

To learn more about us and Blackthorn Asset Management LLC visit our website at www.BlackthornAsset.com .

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston Churchill

Disclosure: This blog is informational and is not a recommendation to buy or sell anything. If you are thinking about investing consider the risk. Everyone’s financial situation is different. Consult your financial advisor.